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Writing Non-Fiction Book Review

Writing Non-Fiction Book Review

Article by Scott Dinsmore









Non-fiction is an extremely well-liked genre; in actual fact, there are so many non-fiction books published that it would be unfeasible to read all of them. Being able to engrave a good non-fiction book review offers real value for non-fiction book lovers.

It is also a grand way to get your writing published online. A good review assists readers come to a decision if it is worth the time and money to buy and read a particular book. Consider using these steps to write an effective non-fiction book review.

The main objective of the non-fiction book review is to make available a detailed outline of material that is presented in the book without giving away all of the key points. You can read the book in as much detail as feasible in order to identify if the stated objective or claims of the book have been presented.

You must try to provide the particulars of the book including the overall idea and whether the book presents these ideas and concepts in a formal or casual manner. Talk about the style of writing in your review. Tell the readers if according to you the book gives enough detailed background on the topic, presents the information in a sequence of tips, provides case studies or uses some other layout to present the material.

You must tell your readers what areas of the topic are enveloped and what areas are left out. Discuss if the information is understandable with enough detail for the reader to learn something new about the subject matter or if it is so common that it adds little new value to the topic. Give a synopsis of any supplementary materials such as the cross-reference and whether an index, bibliography section or other additional information is included.



About the Author

Read more action-provoking posts by Scott Dinsmore, a writer, learner, value investor, speed reading teacher and entrepreneur. His “take-action” oriented book reviews, summaries and articles can be found at Reading For Your Success, where he is committed to enabling people to make their lives and careers a success through action-based reading.










Writing a Critical Book Review

Writing a Critical Book Review

Article by Scott Dinsmore









Writing a critical book review can be an electrifying task. Along with outlining the storyline of a book, a critical book review allows the reviewer to explore all aspects of the text. Critical book reviews are most often done either for the author or for a wider audience.

Study the title of the book. The title should be memorable and out of the ordinary. Also, it should be tied into the book’s text closely. Recognize the genre of the book. Discuss if the text of the book fit the intended genre. If you are unable to find out the genre of the book then most likely the reader will not be able to either.

Remark on the length of the book. Tell, if the book follows the normal length pattern. In case the book is longer than the maximum length, then the author of the book might think about breaking the novel into parts or doing a careful edit to remove excess length. On the other hand, if the novel is shorter than the suggested minimum, then the author may need to go back and add some more detail.

Read the opening lines of the book carefully and comment on whether or not you found the opening lines engaging enough to hold your interest. Next step may be to analyze the dialogue. The dialogue must follow normal speech patterns and not sound forced or compelled. Then again, authors should be careful not to use too much straight dialect or the readers will lose interest.

Talk about the overall plot and theme of the book , what exactly the book is intending to say and if it is actually stated effectively. Comment on if the characters are developed enough and if they contribute to the plot. Finally, check the overall mechanics of the book including grammar, spelling, and punctuation.



About the Author

Read more action-provoking posts by Scott Dinsmore, a writer, learner, value investor, speed reading teacher and entrepreneur. His “take-action” oriented book reviews, summaries and articles can be found at Reading For Your Success, where he is committed to enabling people to make their lives and careers a success through action-based reading.










Writing Articles-Writing for Pleasure, Publicity, Profit or Productivity!- Part 1

Writing Articles-Writing for Pleasure, Publicity, Profit or Productivity!- Part 1

Article by Kanaga Siva









Writing Articles is a skill. To some it comes naturally while others acquire it either by experience or by following courses in the art of writing. Articles are written with a purpose. Some write for Pleasure, some write for Publicity, some for Profit while there are others who write for Productivity especially the Smart Webmasters.

Writing for Pleasure:

Those who write for pleasure have nothing at stake. They write for the love of it. There are no limitations, restrictions or obligations. They let their imagination take wings, float around and put everything in writing. A good writer writing for pleasure ends up with something original and beautiful.

Writing for Publicity:

There is another set of writers who hunger for publicity. They will do anything to see their name and article in print. They will write on any topic. The slightest upheaval in the political situation or the eruption of a volcano in the pacific islands is enough fodder for them to grab their pens and scribble a few words and send them off to the editor of a newspaper. Yes they love publicity and revel in it.

Writing for Profit:

Writing for profit is another aspect altogether. Here your objective is to make money. Produce something your client wants. Sell your product for a price. Many make a living by writing articles and short stories for newspapers and magazines. There are also others who make a living as Ghost writers and Copywriters and often sought after by webmasters to write articles and content for their websites. To remain successful in their vocation productivity does play an important role in their writings.

Writing for Productivity:

Webmasters who write articles and post them to article directories and article distributors fall into this category. Here we are not talking about the number of articles the webmaster is producing but of the maximum quality output or return he gets for his input of time and effort. Pleasure Publicity or Profit is not what he is after. His sole objective is to obtain one way links, thereby increase his link popularity, generate traffic to his website and enjoy other benefits.

Articles written just for the sake of writing and submitting them to article directories simply makes no sense. No one is going to read them. Your articles have to be of acceptable standard, should display your expertise and should be easily understood and appreciated by your audience.

It is only then that your articles will be accepted and published by good article Directories, Ezines and Webmasters.

If you are writing for Productivity, then you have to adopt certain strategies when writing these articles so that you may obtain the maximum one way links, improve your link popularity and enjoy other benefits.

Part 1 of this article deals with the aspects of writing for Pleasure, Publicity and Profit!

Part 2 of this article will explore the aspects of writing for Productivity and achieving your goal as a Smart Webmaster.



About the Author

Copyright ? 2006 Kanaga Siva

Kanaga Siva has a wealth of experience in Marketing,Operating a Successful Home-Based Business and writing popular articles.For quality Articles,Advice and to Make Money From Homeyou are welcome to visit his website http://www.business-fromhome.com










Use Your Journal to Dramatically Improve Your Writing – The Easy Way

Use Your Journal to Dramatically Improve Your Writing – The Easy Way

Article by Will Kalif









If you are keeping a journal on a regular or even semi-regular basis, you have made a great step toward developing your skills as a writer. But, you are probably only using a small part of what a journal can be. You need to take the next step in journal writing and make your journal work for you. Here are some practical tips on how to do that.

Your journal is a place where you put down your thoughts and ideas and this is a great way to keep the creativity flowing and to keep you writing on a regular basis. But thoughts and ideas are not the only things that go into writing fiction. Your fiction takes place in a world and it has people in it. In order for you to successfully communicate your story to your reader you have to create a world that is tangible and people that are believable. These aspects of writing are just like any other aspect in that they takes practice and your journal is the perfect place for you to practice. Here are some basic and easy exercises that will develop your skill as a writer through your journal writing.

Add Descriptive Writing to your Journal

Make a concerted attempt to describe things in your environment. This is a good practical exercise that will help you find your voice in your writing. Writing for an audience means being able to describe your created world to them accurately. You should practice this in your journal and it can be as simple as choosing any object and writing about it. Here are several different techniques for descriptive writing.

1. Describe things – This is an important skill because the description of things can enhance your story. And it makes use of one of the most important rules in writing: “Show don’t tell” Here is an example of two sentences about a pencil:

The writer held a yellow pencil in his hand.

The faded yellow pencil the writer held in his hand was pockmarked with dozens of bite marks, and its eraser was worn right down to the metal band.

In the first sentence the reader understand the situation. But in the second sentence the reader gets an insight into the writer. This is much better than telling your reader that the writer in the story is a nervous type that frequently erases his work and is prone to biting his pencil.

2. Describe Environments Choose any environment and describe it. Start with the room you are writing in then move outward. As you move about your daily life take note of the different environments that you pass through. Describe these in your journal. Remember that this is not an exercise in storytelling. It is an exercise in building a believable world with your writing. And you should do this exercise in two different ways. First do it as you look at the environment you are in. Second you should do it from the memory of an environment that you are not currently in. It is amazing how radically different your perspective of an environment can be between your eyes and your memory.

3. Describe peopleThis is the most important aspect of description. A good description of a person can tell your reader much about the character. Choose a person you know and write a description of him. Don’t just describe his face, describe his body and his gait. Describe the mannerisms he has. Does he use his hands when he talks? Do his arms swing when he walks? What other things should you describe? Remember that your description of him will paint a picture in your reader’s mind.

Add Dialogue to Your Journal

Another skill that you should develop in your writing is the art of dialogue. What your characters say and how they say it can either enhance a story or confuse it. You should practice writing lots of dialogue. Here are some good techniques for incorporating this painlessly into your journal.

1. You should first practice writing dialogues that you have overheard. Do this from memory. What did each person say? And what were the responses and counter responses. 2. You should also practice making your own conversations. This is what you will do in your writing so you should practice it a lot.

Blend Dialogue and Description Together Now try to put the techniques together. Imagine two people engaged in a conversation. Tell your reader the conversation and show your reader the mannerisms of each speaker. Use your descriptions of the speakers and their surroundings to enhance the meaning of the conversation.

Remember that the greatest thing a writer has to offer is his ability to observe and then to think about his observations and communicate those thoughts. But the first thing you have to do is observe. Don’t just use your journal as a way to put down your thoughts and ideas.

How should you integrate these new techniques into your journal writing?

Don’t change your current habit of journal writing. When you take out your journal write in it the same way you always have. Let your thoughts and ideas flow. But, when you feel that you are done with your journal writing for the day go a little bit further and append one of these techniques to it. Add a paragraph describing something or someone or add a paragraph of created conversation. This will add a little bit of time to your journal writing but it will help you quickly develop some new skills as a writer.



About the Author

Will Kalif is the author of two self-published epic fantasy novels.You can download free samples of his work at his personal website:Storm The Castle – Creativity and Fantasy with an edge

Or visit his website devoted to the world of fantasy at: The Fantasy Guide










Is a Book Review the Same As a Book Report? A Guide to Writing Both

Is a Book Review the Same As a Book Report? A Guide to Writing Both

Article by Susan Thomason









A book review and a book report are different in regards to their objective.

A book report shows the content and structure of a book in an objective way. It summarizes the content and analyzes the structure. It intends to give valuable information about the book to help others decide if it is interesting and valuable.

A book review describes, evaluates or criticizes its content. Same as a book report, it explains the content and analyzes its structure, but additionally, you measure the worth of the book and recommend it, or not, to others.

Both center on a specific book, and rarely include research outside of it.

In college, or even for an ESL class, you may be asked to write one or the other, and it is vital that you know exactly what they are asking you to do if you want to excel in your classes. Following is a guide to write both:

1. Bibliography. Includes the author’s name, title and subtitle of the book, editor and edition, place, publisher, date of publication and number of pages. All of it in bibliographical form under the report’s title.

2. Background. Includes the author’s credentials in the area and any influence that may have affected his or her views. Add any interesting data related to the writing of the book.

3. Classification of the book. Is the book fiction or non-fiction? Specify the subject area, for example, medicine, history, travel, biography, law, etc.

4. Classify the author’s intention. How does he or she touches on the subject? Is it a specialized work? Is it meant for professionals, students or just anyone? Is it dedicated to a specific field or is it general?

5. Subject and thesis statement. What’s the book about? Talk about its main subject and the author’s particular point of view on that subject (thesis statement).

6. Structure analysis. The thesis statement will summarize the main idea of the book, however, you have to talk about the order of other ideas and how they relate to the thesis and between them. The headlines and sections will show most of the structure of the book, but you will find other important elements while reading it.

7. Content summary. This is based on your notes, follows the author’s order, and is only composed of main ideas that pinpoint the author’s argument.

8. Critical comments. Check with your professor if the book report should include some criticism. These comments should be the strength of the book review. Here is where you state what you think about the author’s point of view and whether it is valuable for the readers. Consider the following: Was the book’s purpose achieved? Does it contribute to the field? Is it objective? Are there missing facts or evidence? What data supports the author’s opinions? Can this data be interpreted differently? Is the book written clearly? Does the book stimulate discussion? Support your evaluation with evidence from the book, and don’t forget to say whether you liked the piece or work or not.

So, if you were asked to read a book in your ESL class and you must write a book report or book review, now’s your chance to really stand out!

If you liked this article, tell all your friends about it. They’ll thank you for it. If you have a blog or website, you can link to it or even post it to your own site (don’t forget to mention www.englishlci.com as the original source.



About the Author

Susan Thomason has written numerous articles for LCI English Center, an ESL school in Denver, Colorado. LCI offers the best English training through experienced teachers and high quality programs. Check out more ESL articles at http://www.englishlci.com/blog










Write The Perfect Super Bowl Ad: No Real Writing Required?!?

Write The Perfect Super Bowl Ad: No Real Writing Required?!?

Article by Kevin Browne









I want to make this point crystal clear: if you write a Super Bowl ad and it gets produced and shown on the big game down in Florida, your life will be in jeopardy.

Why?

Because the people in the ad business that live and breathe advertising have desperately wanted to accomplish that their ENTIRE careers. (That’s really why they work weekends, spouses!)

Writing a Super Bowl ad is their Mount Everest.

And if you come in and actually write a Super Bowl ad that we end up seeing, and you’re not in the business…well, that’s just crazy.

But here’s why its actually doable:

MOST PEOPLE THINK THAT WRITING A SUPER BOWL AD ACTUALLY INVOLVES SOPHISTICATED WRITING SKILLS.

Dead wrong.

‘Writing’ a Super Bowl Ad is 95% about dreaming up a great idea and then 5% making sure you have one great line at the end of the idea.

That’s right. The ‘writing’ aspect that most people fear ISN’T really writing at all. What you’ll be doing is called…

…concepting. Much, much different than writing. And that’s why the NFL Write a Super Bowl Ad Contest is VERY winnable by someone outside of the advertising world! (Hat’s off to the NFL.)

Writing a book is writing. Writing for CNN IN Iraq is writing. Writing commercials the rest of the year is writing (arguably).

But ‘writing’ a Super Bowl ad is about you dreaming up a killer idea for a brand. You, and a cup of Earl Grey, or a frosty beer, and a set of pads and a Sharpie.

What you’ll be ‘writing’ on your pad will look a lot like this:

“Joe Montana walks into a bar

in the old West. He notices

a skunk at the bar…(MORE HERE)”

Or like this…

“The guy who laces up all the

footballs for the Super Bowl

is missing and his family

thinks…(MORE HERE)”

Or…

“The grocery store is boarded up.

The bowling alley is empty…

The airport is closed…

Why…because…(MORE HERE)”

These are scenarios. They are the theater of the Super Bowl spot that you will write. There are no mechanics to them at this point. There is idea concepting.

Don’t get me wrong…it’s very hard. But this is about you wring a Super Bowl ad, so suffer through it.

Write down as many concepts as you can. Then short list them. Then be brutal on your ideas and narrow them down to 4 Not 3…four. Everyone does the Rule of Three, but you’re trying to be a copywriter…and copywriters do things differently.

Give yourself the time to keep knocking your best ad off its perch (constantly put better and better ads in its place.)

Then, and only after you are convinced that you have written a Super Bowl ad worthy of being produced, do you need to go in and write a line of COPY that ties everything back to the brand…(or in this case for the NFL).

Yes, that’s the extent of the formal writing you’ll need to do. That’s all of it.

But here’s the kicker (pun very much intended here)…it had better be brilliant. Your single line or two of copy had better explain your commercial PERFECTLY. It had also better elevate the brand, and please the salespeople and, and, and…

Basically, and do everything a Super Bowl spot line needs to do.

That’s why it’s SO important when you get to the actual writing to weigh EVERY SINGLE WORD YOU USE. Don’t tell the consumer ‘why.’ Be as assumptive as you can and write the ‘because.’ Because Pepsi is so great…

Because.

The rule of thumb for your copy is two and a half words equal one second of air time.

Don’t use more than 5 seconds of air time on your copy.

Bet you never thought writing a Super Bowl ad involved so little actual WRITING, did you?

Kevin Browne spent twenty plus years as a Creative Director and a Senior Copywriter on Madison Avenue. During that time he wrote and produced hundreds of television commercials.

Kevin is now the founder of http://www.become-a-copywriter.com instructing advertising hopeefuls on EXACTLY how to master the specifics of copywriting.



About the Author

A former Madison Avenue Creative Director and Copywriter, Kevin is the owner of http://www.ArticlePostRobot.com , the BEST, most ultra-inside site for those who truly want to understand the inner workings of the advertising industry.










What Is Freelance E-book Writing?

What Is Freelance E-book Writing?

Article by Brian Konradt









Along with blogging and SEO writing, writing e-books is one of the newest forms of freelance writing. E-books involve a wide variety of subject matter and lets you stretch your writing abilities, rather than being confined to low word counts or narrow subjects. Because of this — and because of the decent pay rate and almost zero overhead — writing e-books is both creatively satisfying, and a lucrative one.

STRUCTURING YOUR E-BOOK

Writing an e-book is different in both content and structure than writing an article or a series of articles. An average magazine article of 2,000 words gives you time to introduce a topic, develop it, discuss some of its implications, and conclude neatly within the allotted word count. Shorter articles–maybe 400 words–give you a sentence or two of introduction, maybe three brisk paragraphs, and a hint of conclusion. E-books, at a bare minimum, give you eight single-spaced pages of material, or about 4,000 words. An e-book is going to reach the thirty, fifty, even hundred-plus page range and contain many more topics and sub-topics.

The vast length of an e-book precludes the simple “introduction-development-conclusion” model that applies to article writing. Instead, you have to develop sophisticated ways to lead your reader through all topics in your e-book. This doesn’t have to be a chore: in fact, it’s one of the most enjoyable, creative parts of writing an e-book.

For example, if you’re writing about DIY home building, you can start your first chapter with the topic “Materials and Planning,” then lead your readers to the next chapter on “Building the Foundation,” and then to chapters on wiring, walls, and roof.

If you’re writing about the history of soda, you may decide a different approach, moving chronologically and focusing on a single “era-defining” soda brand per chapter.

The structure of your book isn’t just a “necessary evil”: it determines the overall flow of your argument, and should be well nailed-down before you start writing. Once you start writing, you’ll thank yourself for setting out a structure beforehand: it’s easy to lose your creative flow in a complicated topic, and developing a good structure can keep you on the right path from start to finish.

WRITING YOUR E-BOOK

In the actual writing, avoid the temptation to pad; your audience can tell. If a chapter seems too slight to you — or if you just want the book to be longer — add additional information from your research and write a subsection or add another chapter.

There’s no topic so narrow that you can’t expand it or use as a starting point for another topic altogether. As long as you’re not exceeding your original chapter structure (or going off on tangents that don’t relate to your topics), there’s no reason not to include as much supplementary material as possible. If it’s all well-integrated with your topic, supplementary material makes your book more comprehensive, more interesting to a wider audience, and a better product.

If you’re writing an e-book for another individual, such as a corporation, or some other entity, you won’t have to deal with marketing the e-book. Just make sure the client is paying you at or above your hourly rate.

MARKETING YOUR E-BOOK

If you’re writing an e-book for yourself, you’ll need to do some work to market your product. At the very least, your e-book should have its own home page, preferably with some free content or even a sample chapter from the book.

Link exchanges are another good promotional tool. Find someone with a web page that deals with the same topic, email the site admin, and ask whether they’d be willing to participate in a link exchange. A link exchange means your e-book’s home site puts up a link to the related site’s content and vice versa. Many people will say yes to a link exchange, and it’s a good way to connect with a wider pool of online traffic (some of whom will hopefully buy the book).

If you have a number of different e-books, you can cross-promote them in one another. If you have a blog, you have a ready-made audience of people interested in your writing who might buy the book.

Finally, “portal” sites full of e-books (similar to Amazon.com for traditional books) are the closest approximation e-books have to a traditional bookstore, and a good way to make your book known to the e-book audience.

THE GLORY OF E-BOOK WRITING

E-book writing is a much larger undertaking than other freelance writing projects. It involves the ability to develop a good chapter structure, to stick to it, and to keep the quality of writing consistent (i.e. never “padded”) throughout the entire length of the e-book.

Once you’re finished, you have a substantial piece of work behind you, and one that can earn you profits almost immediately and continuously through the e-book’s lifespan. If you can write clearly and effectively on a broad and interesting topic, and if you can promote your work vigorously, e-book writing is one of the best ways to launch a career in writing.



About the Author

Brian Konradt is the author of the book, “Freelance Poker Writing: How to Make Money Writing for the Gaming Industry,” available at www.FreelancePokerWriting.com. Learn more about different writing careers at http://www.WritingCareer.com.










What Is Freelance E-book Writing?

What Is Freelance E-book Writing?

Article by Brian Konradt









Along with blogging and SEO writing, writing e-books is one of the newest forms of freelance writing. E-books involve a wide variety of subject matter and lets you stretch your writing abilities, rather than being confined to low word counts or narrow subjects. Because of this — and because of the decent pay rate and almost zero overhead — writing e-books is both creatively satisfying, and a lucrative one.

STRUCTURING YOUR E-BOOK

Writing an e-book is different in both content and structure than writing an article or a series of articles. An average magazine article of 2,000 words gives you time to introduce a topic, develop it, discuss some of its implications, and conclude neatly within the allotted word count. Shorter articles–maybe 400 words–give you a sentence or two of introduction, maybe three brisk paragraphs, and a hint of conclusion. E-books, at a bare minimum, give you eight single-spaced pages of material, or about 4,000 words. An e-book is going to reach the thirty, fifty, even hundred-plus page range and contain many more topics and sub-topics.

The vast length of an e-book precludes the simple “introduction-development-conclusion” model that applies to article writing. Instead, you have to develop sophisticated ways to lead your reader through all topics in your e-book. This doesn’t have to be a chore: in fact, it’s one of the most enjoyable, creative parts of writing an e-book.

For example, if you’re writing about DIY home building, you can start your first chapter with the topic “Materials and Planning,” then lead your readers to the next chapter on “Building the Foundation,” and then to chapters on wiring, walls, and roof.

If you’re writing about the history of soda, you may decide a different approach, moving chronologically and focusing on a single “era-defining” soda brand per chapter.

The structure of your book isn’t just a “necessary evil”: it determines the overall flow of your argument, and should be well nailed-down before you start writing. Once you start writing, you’ll thank yourself for setting out a structure beforehand: it’s easy to lose your creative flow in a complicated topic, and developing a good structure can keep you on the right path from start to finish.

WRITING YOUR E-BOOK

In the actual writing, avoid the temptation to pad; your audience can tell. If a chapter seems too slight to you — or if you just want the book to be longer — add additional information from your research and write a subsection or add another chapter.

There’s no topic so narrow that you can’t expand it or use as a starting point for another topic altogether. As long as you’re not exceeding your original chapter structure (or going off on tangents that don’t relate to your topics), there’s no reason not to include as much supplementary material as possible. If it’s all well-integrated with your topic, supplementary material makes your book more comprehensive, more interesting to a wider audience, and a better product.

If you’re writing an e-book for another individual, such as a corporation, or some other entity, you won’t have to deal with marketing the e-book. Just make sure the client is paying you at or above your hourly rate.

MARKETING YOUR E-BOOK

If you’re writing an e-book for yourself, you’ll need to do some work to market your product. At the very least, your e-book should have its own home page, preferably with some free content or even a sample chapter from the book.

Link exchanges are another good promotional tool. Find someone with a web page that deals with the same topic, email the site admin, and ask whether they’d be willing to participate in a link exchange. A link exchange means your e-book’s home site puts up a link to the related site’s content and vice versa. Many people will say yes to a link exchange, and it’s a good way to connect with a wider pool of online traffic (some of whom will hopefully buy the book).

If you have a number of different e-books, you can cross-promote them in one another. If you have a blog, you have a ready-made audience of people interested in your writing who might buy the book.

Finally, “portal” sites full of e-books (similar to Amazon.com for traditional books) are the closest approximation e-books have to a traditional bookstore, and a good way to make your book known to the e-book audience.

THE GLORY OF E-BOOK WRITING

E-book writing is a much larger undertaking than other freelance writing projects. It involves the ability to develop a good chapter structure, to stick to it, and to keep the quality of writing consistent (i.e. never “padded”) throughout the entire length of the e-book.

Once you’re finished, you have a substantial piece of work behind you, and one that can earn you profits almost immediately and continuously through the e-book’s lifespan. If you can write clearly and effectively on a broad and interesting topic, and if you can promote your work vigorously, e-book writing is one of the best ways to launch a career in writing.



About the Author

Brian Konradt is the author of the book, “Freelance Poker Writing: How to Make Money Writing for the Gaming Industry,” available at www.FreelancePokerWriting.com. Learn more about different writing careers at http://www.WritingCareer.com.










All about writing a Book Review

All about writing a Book Review

Article by Scott Dinsmore









Writing a book review is not so simple that we all think of. You have to put the right blend of imagination with facts and figures. If you would like to analyse a book, you have to know how to write a book review. This can vary right from a book report to a write-up about the book and can be done on any type of literary book. The following article will detail the points for how to write a book review .

The readers must know in short why your judgment of this literary book matters. This should just be a quick write-up that speaks about you to your understandings and makes your view significant enough for reading.

This should not disclose anything crucial about the book rather it should set up the overall theme. It is significant to take in this so that readers who have not read the book will be able to find out if they are even anxious in the topic.

If you know how to write a book review then you make out that opinion should always be a part of the progression. You have to include your personal thoughts to make your readers appreciate your point of view.

Was the literary book reliable in theme? Did the plot get frequently off course, making it difficult to go after? You could also disclose if there were any faults in the logic used by the author or shortfalls which were found there in the story.

A literary book can be complicated to read, but it should constantly flow and uphold interest. If it becomes dry as a bone, then you should bring forward this short fall in the review.

This can be any moments of stunning descriptions. It can also be symbolic connections or anything that adds an implication which will peak the attention of the reader.



About the Author

Read more action-provoking posts by Scott Dinsmore, a writer, learner, value investor, speed reading teacher and entrepreneur. His “take-action” oriented book reviews, summaries and articles can be found at Reading For Your Success, where he is committed to enabling people to make their lives and careers a success through action-based reading.










Writing a Comic Book Reviews

Writing a Comic Book Reviews

Article by Scott Dinsmore









I decide on what I want to write about, I learn about the pieces of a good story and sometimes I even earn money writing comic book or graphic novel reviews . Here are some nice steps that focus on writing the basic comic book review.

If you start with the classics and want to develop into a comic book reviewer, you need to know the basics of this vast world. That involves exploring titles like “Watchmen” and “The Dark Knight Returns,” and the writers behind them.

Also, you need to explore publishers outside of Marvel and DC. Sure, it is fun reading a series of straight popular issues like of Spider-Man or Batman, however as a comic book reviewer , you must learn about small publishers too. Also, without doubt, these comic publishers need your help more than the big ones. You need to see the slant in writing style and artwork for this comic book. It will become the thesis for your review. Developing a thesis can help you write the review. You must develop an art to entertain readers by explaining the themes of this story. All stories have themes; even an old Spider-Man comic has a premise. So you can ask questions, evaluate and contrast, before writing a good review.

You generally do not need to write a 400-word review of a 20-page comic book. When you are writing a graphic novel review , or a trade review you have more material to work on, so it really is not that difficult.

You must get your review copies and take delight in the fact people are reading and appreciating your work. Because they are reading your work, whether it is for a particular site or your own comic blog, someone there want to read your material. Quite possible that the bigger publishers do not respond to appeals for review copies, but some will, and you will acquire free comics. It is great fun that from now on, you can pick and choose what you read and save cash doing it.



About the Author

Read more action-provoking posts by Scott Dinsmore, a writer, learner, value investor, speed reading teacher and entrepreneur. His “take-action” oriented book reviews, summaries and articles can be found at Reading For Your Success, where he is committed to enabling people to make their lives and careers a success through action-based reading.